Deciding to Accept a Leadership Role Within a Ministry – Brian P. Cox


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Deciding to accept a leadership role can be very daunting. I have compiled some items below that I trust will help you in your decision making process. These items will only work when you have God at the foundation of your deliberations.

• Do you have time for the position right now?
* Could it be that this position may add too much to your plate at this season in your life? On the other hand perhaps it may be time to stop some other activities in order to make room for this new opportunity. Spend some time laying out what your schedule would be like. This will help you make the correct decision.
* The ministry may ask you to make a commitment to hold the position for a certain amount of time. Be sure that you know what the expectations are. Are you ready to commit to the duration of time the position requires?

• Do the ministry’s core beliefs match your own?
* Being a leader for a ministry is like being in a romantic relationship. Consider the following example: You can be so excited about new things that you don’t want to ask tough questions about the other person, because asking those questions might damage the relationship. When in reality, the tough questions are the only true test in determining compatibility with the other person.
* Take a hard look at the ministry’s statement of beliefs. Also, consider discussing those beliefs with a person you would be reporting to, should you accept the position. Be ready to ask all the questions that you feel led to bring up. Remember that if this ministry wants you to be a leader, then they need to trust your judgment. They should accept a discussion with open arms.

• Do you feel that you are being coerced, manipulated or pushed into this position?
* Ask God to pull you back from your own perspective, and to give you His view of the situation. Ask him to show you any hidden purposes in both the physical and spiritual world. Ask God to remove all pride to give you humility at all times (especially as you make this decision).
* Being asked to be a leader can be very flattering. That flattery can cloud your judgment. There is no question that you have talents which God has blessed you with. However, that talent will only be effective if it is in alignment with His will and His timing.

• Is your discernment and judgment respected by the current leadership?
* As a leader, you will need to constantly assess the events that you are responsible le for. Furthermore, you may need to adjust the course of an event or perhaps even bring it to a halt if you determine that it is moving away from God’s will. Does the leadership understand that you will be using all of your senses to discern how God is moving? Will the leadership trust your judgment, and give you the authority to act on that discernment? Keep in mind that you must operate with the understanding that you will
need to always act under the guidelines that the leaders give you so that you don’t enter into rebellion. Will those guidelines restrict the way that God is moving in your life?

• Consider seeking counsel from others regarding this decision.

• Discussing your decision with others can be very helpful, nevertheless, keep the following in mind:
* Your counselors should be Christians, whom you believe to be in alignment with the Holy Spirit and should have experience in leadership.
*If you are married, then your spouse should be your primary counselor.
* Your counselors should not be one of the people that you would report to. This helps assure an impartial opinion.
* Avoid seeking counsel from too many people. Every new counselor is another new opinion. By limiting your advisors, you will be able to maintain your focus. Try to limit the count to two or three people.

• Sometimes the invitation to participate in leadership involves a deadline. There is nothing wrong with deadlines, in fact we can use them to help determine God’s will. It may be that you are not able to make a decision in time allotted. That very fact could be confirmation that it is not part of God’s timing to accept the position.

• Once you have made your decision, using the factors listed above, be ready to stand by it.
* If you agree to accept the position, be ready to be tenacious in your position as a leader for the duration of your commitment. Being a leader is very challenging. Remember that God has brought you into this position, and it is God’s responsibility to equip you with everything you need. Some people meet trials as a leader, and begin to think that the trials mean they shouldn’t have taken the position. This is not necessarily true. We need to only go as far as the book of Acts to see that effective people of God can face extreme challenges!
* If you decide not to accept the position, keep a close eye on the leaders when you let them know. Their behavior will tell you a lot about the future of your relationship with this ministry.

• If they respect your decision, and treat you cordially, then you will know that these are people you would like to work with in the future. Perhaps new opportunities will arise that will match up with God’s will and timing for your life.

• If they question your decision, and try to talk you into accepting the position, then this means they don’t really trust your judgment, and it’s a very good thing that you didn’t take the position. Remember that all you should have to say is, “I don’t believe that this is what God intends for my life right now.”