Enid’s – Barbara Parker


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Every time I think of Enid’s I hear the phrase from the old hymn, “There is a place of quiet rest near to the heart of God.” So what, you may wonder, is Enid’s? And, surprisingly, this place of refuge is not a church or chapel or ministry center—it’s a wig store. Labeled with a cancer diagnosis, it’s where I went when I was struggling to cope with the idea of losing all of my hair.

Years ago, in the days when nurses wore perky, white, starched caps, I had a short, curly, red wig. Keeping my long hair neatly up and under my cap was quite a challenge so I would hide it under the wig—much easier and quite a time-saver. But it’d been a very long time, and now it wasn’t for convenience—it was a necessity, unless I wanted to go around bald or wearing a scarf, thus branding myself as a cancer patient, and that idea just didn’t work for me—I wanted to look and act as normal as possible. I wondered if I could even find a wig that would look natural, so off I went to find the store. Five minutes after I walked through the front door I felt like I’d entered some other dimension where it was party time. All around me were women with no hair, laughing, talking, and trying on wigs and hats, browsing through lingerie and swimsuits, checking out pretty pieces of jewelry and selecting make-up. Enid, a cancer survivor herself, and her staff were more like cheerleaders than sales ladies; encouraging everyone, patiently helping us try on style after style and telling us how good we looked, teaching us how to cope, answering questions, sharing their own experiences—they’d been where we were now. I can’t imagine a support group that would have been more helpful—it was as if everyone had checked their diagnosis at the door and entered an arena of hope.

Hope—an intangible orientation toward the future, expecting something that is not yet a reality—a belief that there can be a positive outcome even when all evidence says otherwise. “Hope that is not seen is no hope at all. Who hopes for what he already has? But, if we hope for what we do not yet have, we wait for it patiently.” (Romans 8:24b-25) Hope is often what keeps us going in the face of adversity. It may motivate a rescue team searching a mountain for a missing hiker, a teacher working with a learning-disabled child, an unemployed man searching for a job so he can provide for his family, a terminally-ill patient looking for a cure, or a lonely person looking for a friend—or me, looking for relief in the midst of my pain. There were times during my treatment when I identified with Job as he cried out to the LORD, “What strength do I have, that I should still hope? What prospects, that I should be patient? Do I have the strength of stone? Is my flesh bronze?” (Job 6:11-12) But I knew I could trust God’s promise that, “Those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint,” (Isaiah 40:31) so I held on. And God did not disappoint me. One morning as I awoke I saw a vision of a blank sheet of bright yellow paper floating before my eyes and I was comforted, for I immediately knew without a doubt that this was him telling me that the next page in the book of my life was before me, a page full of hope.

The LORD also encouraged me with a living example of His love, as described in Psalm 147:11, “the LORD delights in those who fear him, who put their hope in his unfailing love,” as I observed the joy of my son, Kevin, as he anticipated his wedding; and the look on his face as he watched his bride, Rachel, walk down the aisle to become his wife. Her hope was evident too—the bride preparing for herself for her bridegroom, fully confident in his love; knowing that he would be there to welcome her into his home; to love her; to honor her; to protect her—and I remembered that we, the church, can rest in that same kind of hope because we are the Bride of Christ. And once again, instead of crying like Job, I was able to rejoice like David, “Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him. He alone is my rock and my salvation; he is my fortress, I will not be shaken.” (Psalm 62:5-6)

As I write this a familiar chorus comes to mind, “Freely, freely, you have received; freely, freely give. Go in my name and because you believe, others will know that I live.” (Author, Carol Owens) And I remember the story in Luke 10 of the Good Samaritan who gave so freely to man in need, a man left for dead—a man who needed hope. And I pray that I may do likewise—that I will bring hope to those who need it.

I still go back to Enid’s. I use the excuse that I need to pick up some make-up or a scarf; but the truth is that there are a lot of places I could buy those things, and I really go back because I love to be there. I love to visit those wonderful ladies who probably don’t even realize what a wonderful blessing they are. I love to see hope in action!



The majority of these prayers are included in our book Generational Prayers – 2020 Edition, which is available in paperback and eBook formats. Visit this page for details.

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These prayers are not a quick fix. Instead, they are starting points as you work out your freedom in Christ. Be ready to adjust these prayers as you and those you pray with listen to the Holy Spirit.

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About Barbara Parker

Barbara Parker, the founder of Standing in Faith Ministries, endeavors to serve others by sharing the faith lessons God has taught her through the everyday trials of life. She is a wife, a mother, and a grandmother; and she worked for many years as a registered nurse and as a real estate broker. A survivor of breast cancer and several other major illnesses, Barbara holds the unshakable belief that God is big enough for any problem that life throws at you. It is this faith that enabled her when she worked as a hospice nurse, providing comfort to the dying and their loved ones. It is this faith that she writes and speaks about. Barbara graduated from the Los Angeles County Hospital School of Nursing and holds a BS in Health Science (Summa Cum Laude) from Chapman University, a Certificate in Fundraising from Loyola Marymount University, and a Certificate in Grant Writing from the Grantsmanship Center of Los Angeles. A Christian since childhood, she pretty-much grew up in church and has served in a variety of ministry roles including music, teaching, administration and counseling. She completed several post-graduate-level courses in Theology, trained as a church counselor at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, CA, and completed a variety of schools and workshops with Aslan’s Place and other ministries. Barbara is a prayer minister endorsed by Aslan’s Place, where she often participates as a team member in ministry across the USA and abroad. She participates in a network of home churches, worshiping and developing relationships in a small group setting. Barbara is the author/editor/publisher of Pug Parables, I’m Still Standing and Richard’s Story which are available at Barbara's Store. She also has a DVD series, Unraveling the Mystery of Dream Interpretation, available at Aslan's Place. Barbara speaks to groups of any size, sharing her testimony and teaching others how to stand in faith. She is passionate about the fact that Christians can overcome every difficult circumstance through an intimate relationship with God in all three of his persons; Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Barbara can be reached through her website www.standinginfaith.org